Archive | October, 2011

Regorafenib meets primary endpoint of improving overall survival in metastatic colorectal cancer (phase III Trial)

Bayer announced the result of a pre-planned interim analysis conducted by an independent Data Monitoring Committee (DMC) of the CORRECT (Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with regorafenib or placebo after failure of standard t herapy) trial. Per the recommendation of the DMC, the study has been unblinded and patients in the placebo arm will […]

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The Impact of Consolidation on Pharmaceutical R&D

Over the past 10 years or so there has been an enormous amount of consolidation in the life science industry. While this activity has been very good for shareholders, it has had a devastating effort on pharmaceutical R&D says John  LaMattina PhD, a chemist, blogger, author and former President of Pfizer Global R&D. In his […]

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Where in the world are drugs invented? Measuring pharmaceutical globalization.

The global locations of drug invention are important for public health, economic development, and national security reasons. Inventors tend to focus on diseases endemic to where they live. This is one of the problems of neglected diseases — there are few/no researchers working on certain diseases, which can lead to significant public health problems. Drugs […]

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Your iPhone won’t give you brain cancer…

…nor will your Blackberry, Android handset and presumably not your iPad either. Despite the hopes and dreams of millions of technophobes and pseudoscientists, the biggest ever study of mobile phone use shows that the devices do not increase the risk of brain tumours. The European study looked at more than a third of a million […]

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Ada Lovelace Day for Miss Hall

In case you missed it, it’s Ada Lovelace Day. Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852), born Augusta Ada Byron (yes, she was the only child of the poet Lord Byron). She is perhaps best known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the analytical engine. […]

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Inject-and-solidify: new biomaterials for tissue restoration

Biocompatible polymers are avidely sought for owing to their frequent use in reconstructive sugery and as prostheses. One of the challenges is to make implants that are easy to inserate, minimizing scarring and recovery time. A team led by Prof. Jennifer Helisseeff at Johns Hopkins University recently presented a novel implant, that can be injected […]

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