Archive | February, 2011

Chemical elements in short supply

During the second half of 2010 a term usually reserved to specialized audiences started to spread in mainstream media: the rare-earth elements. Although they are not so scarce as their name would suggest, increasing concerns about their availability in the near future were expressed, and a recent issue of Nature Materials featured several articles dedicated […]

Continue Reading

BioJobBlog Creates a New BioJobCenter Widget for Scientists, Regulatory Affairs and Quality Personnel and Other Bioprofessionals

About a month ago, BioJobBlog in association with the JobJob Health Job Board launched the BioJobCenter; an automated job board designed to help persons looking for employment in the life sciences industry. While the site has been well received, we decided to create a widget for BioJobBlog that features the types of job openings that […]

Continue Reading

A Good Example of Why Politics and Science MUST NEVER Be Mixed

Last week, the US House of Representatives voted to cut FDA funding by $220 million. The House vote was not surprising given the prevailing attitude among many pharmaceutical and biotechnology company executives that FDA approval of new drugs and devices has become increasingly difficult. While there is no question that the current approval process for […]

Continue Reading

Six slick science picks

Science video widget – Shortform offered me a sneak preview of their video widget, which allows users to embed a video channel into their blog. Contraceptive pill not to blame for feminized fish – Despite claims that excreted contraceptive hormones are causing endocrine disruption in aquatic animals evidence suggests that this is not the case. […]

Continue Reading

Evolution: Only in America!

Charles Darwin was born on February 12, 1809. Many societies and institutions annually celebrate the anniversary of his birth by hosting a Darwin Day to celebrate his theory (dare I say it) of evolution. Typically, these celebrations are held at universities, museums and schools in parts of the US where evolution is embraced and taught. While […]

Continue Reading

Can we count on journal metrics?

How do you rank science, how do you rate scientists, what kudos do you give their papers and what metrics do you attach to the impact of a paper? They’re questions as old as the scientific literature itself. But, no one has resolved them. Independent organisations and publishers have attempted with the likes of the […]

Continue Reading