Archive | January, 2011

Why the US is Quickly Losing Ground in Science Competitiveness

This was a very disturbing article in this past Wednesday’s New York Times entitled “Few Students Show Proficiency In Science, Federal Tests Show.” According to the article, on the most recent nationwide science tests called the National Assessment of Education Progress, only 33 percent of fourth graders and 20 percent of high school seniors scored […]

Continue Reading

Social networking with research data

I’d previously used the phrase “Napster for Research Papers” when thinking about Mendeley. Mendeley lets you upload your own research papers to your personal library under publishers’ fair use agreements and to share them with their peers as you might share a traditional paper reprint. So, maybe Napster was never the right metaphor…there’s nothing illegal […]

Continue Reading

Scientists and the Media: must do better

At a time when public expenses are shrinking, scientists are under close scrutinity and must justify the money they spend. Researchers are therefore increasingly exposed to the media, and it seems appropriate to ask whether they are ready for that. Two recent examples tend to show that they are not. The first is the clumsy […]

Continue Reading

Future of Monoclonal Antibodies….

History: It was in 1890, when von Behring and Kitasato reported that animal   antitoxin serum could protect against lethal doses of toxins in humans, antisera have been used toneutralize pathogens in acute disease as well as in prophylaxis. Antisera invariably induce an immune response resulting in joint pains, fevers, and sometimes life threatening anaphylactic shock. […]

Continue Reading

Geoengineering: a hard blow

In a former post I mentioned several ideas that had come forth as potential ways to deal with global warming. I had my doubts about some of these propositions, and these doubts were recently confirmed when I read an article in French newspaper Le Figaro. The article relates a meeting of dozens of geoengineering specialists […]

Continue Reading

Platinum and Blue Light Combine to Combat Cancer…

Research led by the University of Warwick, along with researchers from Ninewells Hospital Dundee, and the University of Edinburgh, have found a new light-activated platinum-based compound that is up to 80 times more powerful than other platinum-based anti-cancer drugs and which can use “light activation” to kill cancer cells in a much more targeted way […]

Continue Reading

Science books for the New Year

These are my recent science book finds for the New Year The science of kissing – When did humans begin to kiss? Why is kissing integral to some cultures and alien to others? Do good kissers make the best lovers? And is that expensive lip-plumping gloss worth it? Sheril Kirshenbaum, a biologist and science journalist, […]

Continue Reading